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Precious Metal

At Chuwawah Jewellery, our jewellery is crafted with only the finest materials, ensuring you a lifetime of value. Learn more about the variety of metals we offer to find the one that is right for you.

Platinum

The most popular metal for engagement rings and wedding bands, platinum’s naturally white sheen will never fade or change colour, and accentuates the sparkle and brilliance of a diamond. Platinum will last forever, making it the ultimate symbol for true, enduring, and everlasting love.

 

Pt 900 VS Pt 950

The notations ".900" and ".950" speak to the purity of platinum, but not to its quality; the percentage is too small to significantly affect the quality. 

A ".950" purity hallmark indicates that the pure platinum has been alloyed with 5% of another metal.

A ".900" purity hallmark indicates that the pure platinum has been alloyed with 10% of another metal. 

Rhodium 

Rhodium is a silvery-white transition metal. It holds the distinction of being the world's most expensive precious metal. It has an atomic number of 45 and is about as nonreactive as gold. The only way to dissolve rhodium is with sulfuric acid. Part of rhodium's appeal comes from its high reflectance, almost unique among the metals. It is sometimes used as an expensive and flashy alternative to silver in jewellery, on which it is sometimes plated. Some of the most expensive consumer items in the world are made from rhodium.

Rhodium plating is a metal deposition process used to coat materials with a decorative and protective layer of rhodium. Rhodium is a noble metal that imparts an extremely bright and hard wearing finish when applied as plating.   When applied as a thin plate, it affords a durable finish of exceptional brightness.  Rhodium finishes can greatly enhance the appearance and longevity of any metal to which they are applied.

Gold

Gold has an extraordinary heritage with unique qualities. As an enduring element found naturally in a distinct yellow colour, gold is resistant to rust, tarnish, and corrosion. Although gold is very strong, it's also the most malleable of all precious metals.

Pure gold is too soft for everyday wear, so it is alloyed with a mixture of metals like silver, copper, nickel, and zinc to give it strength and durability. Karatage, denoted by a number followed by "k" indicates purity, or how much of the metal in a piece of jewellery is gold. Karatage is expressed in 24ths, making 24k gold, 100% gold.

We craft our jewellery using both 18k and 14k gold. 18k gold is composed of 75% gold, which is alloyed with other metals to make it strong enough for everyday wear. 14k gold is composed of 58.3% gold and 41.7% of other metals.

The colour of gold is determined by two factors:

  • The type of metal alloys included
  • The percentage of each metal alloy

Yellow Gold
Natural gold and colour-saturated alloys are what give yellow gold jewellery its rich shine. The alloys most commonly used, are copper with a red hue, and silver featuring a green hue. An expert mixture of copper, silver and pure gold gives this precious metal its signature warmth.

White Gold
A silvery white character is what makes white gold jewellery so appealing. In order to make the gold white, it is combined with metal alloys that are white in nature and plated with an extremely hard element called rhodium. Although strong, rhodium may wear away over time. Replating is a simple process that can be done to restore whiteness to your jewellery.

Rose Gold

The beautiful pink hue of rose gold jewellery is created by using a copper alloy. Again, the overall percentages of metal alloys is the same for rose gold as it is for yellow or white, there is just a different mixture in what alloys are used.

Sliver

The silver jewellery and accessories available at Chuwawah Jewellery are made of beautiful sterling silver with rhodium or gold plated. For our collection, we have chosen classic and modern designs created by some of the finest craftsmen. This guide will help you learn to identify quality in silver jewellery and accessories.

One common question that is asked is, what is the difference between sterling silver and 925 silver. The short answer is, there is none. Sterling silver and 925 silver are different names for the same silver alloy.

Pure silver is much too soft to be used in jewellery, it is often combined with other metals to create a more durable metal. When 92.5% of pure silver is mixed with 7.5% of other metals (often copper, nickel or zinc) the resulting alloy is called sterling silver. To identify it as such, the number 925 is stamped upon the silver, often in a hidden part of the jewellery. This number is known as the hallmark and denotes the percentage of silver purity in the alloy. In other words, 925 is the same as sterling silver, meaning that if there is any other stamp on the metal, it is not sterling silver. Alternately, the hallmarks STER, STG, SS and Sterling Silver may be stamped in place of 925.